A Net Nanny with an MLSintellectual freedom, libraries

by Meredith Farkas on 12/24/2004 with 0 comment

Wow! In an age of shrinking budgets and shrinking staffs, the Phoenix Public Libraries has secured $175,000 to hire one full time professional librarian and three paraprofessionals to police their no-porn policies. The professional, this “Internet Resource Specialist”, would monitor people’s use of the Internet and deal with people’s requests to turn off the filters …

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Where Google leads…intellectual freedom, open source, our digital future

by Meredith Farkas on 12/18/2004 with 0 comment

Here is an interesting article I found via Resource Shelf. The Open Archive Initiative (OAI) and Google Scholar by Nick Luft looks at one positive effect Google (and specifically Google Scholar) may have on digital publishing. One of the greatest barriers to retrieving and exchanging scholarly information online is the fact that database vendors (and …

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Kahle vs. Ashcroftintellectual freedom

by Meredith Farkas on 12/4/2004 with 1 comment

I don’t have anything to say about the case that hasn’t been said before, but I am really saddened by the fact that this case, challenging the Sony Bono Copyright Term Extension Act, has been dismissed. To me, this is a clear sign (among many) that our government has moved completely away from any consideration …

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If it didn’t work for the RIAA…intellectual freedom, our digital future

by Meredith Farkas on 11/17/2004 with 0 comment

The MPAA has filed their first bunch of lawsuits against people who offer movies for download. Apparently they were inspired by the rousing success of the RIAA’s campaign to sue music sharers into oblivion (hmmm… how’s that going?). Slightly more scary is the Intellectual Property Protection Act which contains a slew of measures including criminal …

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Glad they didn’t have these when I was in school!intellectual freedom, our digital future

by Meredith Farkas on 11/17/2004 with 0 comment

Cutting class — almost a right of passage in high school — is no longer an option for Houston area students. According to the NY Times, children in Houston area schools are being equipped with RFID tags that monitor their movements. While this particular project was designed for benign purposes (to prevent kidnappings), it isn’t …

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