Computers in Libraries Recap: Day 3free the information!, librarianship, libraries, management, our digital future, tech trends

by Meredith Farkas on 4/15/2010 with 1 comment

I took an absolutely obscene amount of notes from Ken Haycock’s keynote, because it was just one pearl of wisdom after another (I’m only including some choice bits here). I’ve seen Ken speak once before, and he is someone I would go out of my way to hear speak because he has such deep knowledge …

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Computers in Libraries Recap: Day 1free the information!, librarianship, our digital future, social software, tech trends

by Meredith Farkas on 4/14/2010 with 5 comments

Since it had been two years since I’d been to an Information Today Conference, I was really excited to attend Computers in Libraries and it did not disappoint. It was a fantastic learning and social experience with a much more diverse array of sessions than in previous years. I was really happy to see a …

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Coming to terms with Twitterfree the information!, librarianship, library school, our digital future, social software, tech trends

by Meredith Farkas on 4/7/2010 with 11 comments

I’ve been teaching a class on Web 2.0 since 2007, and this semester is the first time that I’ve actually had a full week on Twitter (well, microblogging and lifestreaming to be specific). Before, I treated it sort of as an afterthought, including some information on Twitter during the two weeks that I covered blogging. …

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A lot of Davids make one heck of a GoliathALA, free the information!, libraries, open access, our digital future, tech trends

by Meredith Farkas on 4/5/2010 with 9 comments

In response to my post a few days ago about EBSCO, Sarah Houghton-Jan just wrote an impassioned post about unethical vendor practices, suggesting that we let our vendors know when we are not happy with what they’re doing. While I do agree that libraries should make their dissatisfaction with specific vendors or vendor practices known …

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Teaching Web 2.0 with Web 2.0free the information!, librarianship, library school, online education, social software, tech trends

by Meredith Farkas on 1/23/2010 with 6 comments

After a year off from teaching to take care of baby Reed, I’m getting back up on the horse. I’ll be teaching a class on Web 2.0 and Social Networking Software for San Jose State University’s SLIS program starting this Tuesday. As usual, I’ll be using Drupal for my online classroom (rather than Angel, which …

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Shades of grayassessment, librarianship, libraries, open source, our digital future, tech trends

by Meredith Farkas on 11/2/2009 with 26 comments

Ever since the news of LibLime’s enterprise version of Koha and whether or not their actions consisted a fork of the code, I’ve been thinking about how black and white some of us (me included, at times) tend to see library products and library vendors. Stephen Abram’s “position paper” on open source ILSes got me …

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Great new books on my “to read” listassessment, librarianship, libraries, our digital future, social software, tech trends, writing

by Meredith Farkas on 7/6/2009 with 3 comments

I must admit that the last time I read a non-baby-related book was probably last Fall. And now all these great books are coming out from the LIS presses that I’m absolutely dying to read! This is torture! The one I’m probably most excited about is Chrystie Hill’s long-awaited Inside, Outside and Online which is …

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2.0 or and bustblogging, libraries, RSS and Syndication, screencasting, social bookmarking, social software, tech trends, Wikis

by Meredith Farkas on 7/4/2009 with 11 comments

Since before my brain was hijacked by baby stuff, I’ve been thinking a lot about how many third party Web 2.0 vendors libraries are dependent upon (not to mention all the ones we’re dependent on personally!). I actually wrote a column for American Libraries on the subject, but 600 words could not reflect the whole …

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Congrats to the 2009 Movers and Shakers!career, librarianship, libraries, management, our digital future, social software, tech trends

by Meredith Farkas on 3/16/2009 with 3 comments

Take a look at this truly amazing group of people that Library Journal chose to recognize this year. I’ve never known more folks on the list and so many are folks I absolutely adore: Sarah Houghton-Jan – it’s kind of amazing that she had not been recognized as a Mover and Shaker before this given …

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It’s not all about the tech – why 2.0 tech failslibraries, management, online education, our digital future, social software, speaking, tech trends

by Meredith Farkas on 3/14/2009 with 6 comments

Yesterday, I gave a talk for the ACRL Virtual Conference entitled Can’t Get There From Here: Achieving Organization 2.0. If you’re registered for the Virtual Conference or the regular ACRL Conference, you can access the archive of the talk, and if not, my slides and links to what I discussed are provided on my presentation …

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Online conferences – the future is nowALA, free the information!, librarianship, online education, our digital future, social software, speaking, tech trends

by Meredith Farkas on 2/15/2009 with 11 comments

I’ve been lucky to have had some recent involvement with two online conference models — one that recently happened and one that will be happening soon. I’m really pleased to see more organized professional development opportunities being offered online in light of the current economic situation and, selfishly, the fact that I personally won’t be …

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Separate but not equal?librarianship, libraries, online education, our digital future, reference, social software, Work

by Meredith Farkas on 1/10/2009 with 24 comments

When I read David King’s post about Ask-a-Librarian services last week, I didn’t have a strong emotional response to it. That was, until he wrote a follow up which brought my attention to some of the responses people had made to it. With email reference, it’s pretty obvious that it’s not a synchronous medium. We …

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