Get your feed out there blogging

by Meredith Farkas on 1/19/2005 with 0 comment

For those who have an RSS feed for their blog, you can now easily submit your feed to 15 aggregators using Feed Submitter by Thomas Korte. If you find that your submission fails on some of the aggregator sites, it may be because you’re already listed on there. [via Research Buzz]

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Spamfighters random

by Meredith Farkas on 1/19/2005 with 0 comment

Is referrer spam getting you down? Killing refferer spam has become an obsession for Dorothea at Caveat Lector over the past week, and she shares some useful tips on how to eradicate it, along with a narrative of her own experiences. Don’t know what referrer spam is? Here’s a definition from Wikipedia: When someone accesses …

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Encouraging discussions at ALA libraries

by Meredith Farkas on 1/15/2005 with 0 comment

While I’m kind of bummed about not making it to ALA Midwinter, I’ve gotten to hear all about it from the PLA Blog, Library Techtonics, and It’s All Good. A lot of what I’ve been reading has been very encouraging in terms of librarians and libraries embracing change and new ideas. Alice from OCLC wrote …

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Folksonomies: Listen to Jessamyn search

by Meredith Farkas on 1/15/2005 with 0 comment

Jessamyn said “learn this word: folksonomy” and I make it a point to always listen to Jessamyn. Actually, I’ve been hearing quite a lot about folksonomies lately, between my Theory of Information Retrieval class last semester and the recent discussion on Slashdot. Folksonomies are the taxonomic vocabularies generated from such sites as del.icio.us and flickr, …

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A new corporate approach to intellectual property open access, open source, our digital future

by Meredith Farkas on 1/13/2005 with 0 comment

IBM is making 500 of its patents available for free to people doing open source projects. Rock on! From the New York Times: I.B.M. executives say the company’s new approach to intellectual property represents more than a rethinking of where the company’s self-interest lies. In recent speeches, for example, Samuel J. Palmisano, I.B.M.’s chief executive, …

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User-centered technology implementation libraries, our digital future

by Meredith Farkas on 1/13/2005 with 0 comment

David King wrote two responses to Michael Stephen’s 2005 library tech predictions. The first one highlights the importance of user-centered technology planning and implementation. This is something that cannot be stressed enough. There are libraries that are completely adverse to change and to technology, and there are libraries that are so tech-forward that they pass …

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Web design resources our digital future

by Meredith Farkas on 1/13/2005 with 0 comment

I just discovered Spectacle today. It is a gorgeous site with lots of links to the coolest web design resources. From there, you can see Forty Media’s web design predictions for 2005, which list the trends they think we will see in web design this year. You can also find the CSS Playground, which shows …

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PLA blog is up! General

by Meredith Farkas on 1/13/2005 with 0 comment

The PLA Blog is now up and running! It will have some great public library-related reports from the ALA Midwinter Conference by some very familiar faces in the library blogging world. It’s almost as good as being there! I’d wanted to go, but couldn’t really justify the expense considering my current lack of employment. I …

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The impact of open access our digital future

by Meredith Farkas on 1/9/2005 with 0 comment

Peter Suber at Open Access News pointed me to a very interesting pre-print article about the citation impact of open access journal articles. Citation Impact of Open Access Articles vs. Articles available only through subscription (“Toll-Access”) is still in the analysis stages, but they seem to have found that with physics and mathematics journals, those …

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Questioning information literacy libraries, reference

by Meredith Farkas on 1/9/2005 with 1 comment

Here is an article from the Chronicle of Higher Education that has been causing some controversy on the library-related listservs. Information Literacy Makes All the Wrong Assumptions rails against the traditional ideas behind information literacy curricula. While I disagree with much of what the author has written, he does raise some interesting points. I’ve never …

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Alternative economic model for online publishing our digital future

by Meredith Farkas on 1/7/2005 with 0 comment

John Batelle offers up an interesting model for generating revenue with online open access publishing in an article in this month’s MIT Technology Review. Batelle makes the suggestion for “an alternative economy in which the long-standing imbalance between publisher, audience, and advertiser could be corrected.” It’s a short article and definitely worth a read. [via …

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Would you pay to read the New York Times online? our digital future

by Meredith Farkas on 1/7/2005 with 0 comment

Techdirt reported today that the New York Times is considering charging to allow people access to their website. Really really bad idea. It seems that the newspaper, like many others, doesn’t know how to adapt its business model to the current information provision environment. Here’s an excerpt from Techdirt’s coverage. We’ve already explained how the …

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