A Net Nanny with an MLS intellectual freedom, libraries

by Meredith Farkas on 12/24/2004 with Comments Off on A Net Nanny with an MLS

Wow! In an age of shrinking budgets and shrinking staffs, the Phoenix Public Libraries has secured $175,000 to hire one full time professional librarian and three paraprofessionals to police their no-porn policies. The professional, this “Internet Resource Specialist”, would monitor people’s use of the Internet and deal with people’s requests to turn off the filters …

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The sound of silence random

by Meredith Farkas on 12/22/2004 with 1 comment

I’m not one of those people who really notices the sound my computer makes. All through college I practically slept with my laptop on the bed next to me (how romantic!). My husband, on the other hand, is really sensitive to noise, and has made it his life’s mission to build silent and cool running …

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Google’s Herculean task libraries, our digital future

by Meredith Farkas on 12/22/2004 with Comments Off on Google’s Herculean task

Here’s an interesting article from the San Francisco Gate about how Google has so far undertaken their Herculean digitization task. According to the article, at the rate they’re going at the University of Michigan, it will take approximately 19 years to do all 7 million books in the collection (and at $10 a book will …

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Teens in the library libraries, random

by Meredith Farkas on 12/22/2004 with 4 comments

Since I was up for a teen librarian position (which I did not get, sigh…) I’ve been thinking a lot about what libraries do for teens. The library I was interviewing at had a small area by the DVDs that was called the “teen section.” All this consisted of was YA books and magazines and …

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Satellite radio safe… for now intellectual freedom

by Meredith Farkas on 12/20/2004 with Comments Off on Satellite radio safe… for now

According to the Curmudgeony Librarian, the FCC has declined a request by a Saul Levine — a California radio station owner — to apply the same standards to satellite radio as they do to AM/FM radio. Essentially, he wanted satellite radio to be censored just like AM/FM radio: Levine argued among other things that this …

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Discretely blogging our digital future, random

by Meredith Farkas on 12/19/2004 with Comments Off on Discretely blogging

I don’t always agree with everything Free Range Librarian writes, but I think she is pretty darn right in her entry today about confidentiality and discretion. We librarians are all about free speech. But the First Amendment won’t make you less of a chump for kiss-and-tell blogging, and it won’t expunge the stain to your …

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Where Google leads… intellectual freedom, open source, our digital future

by Meredith Farkas on 12/18/2004 with Comments Off on Where Google leads…

Here is an interesting article I found via Resource Shelf. The Open Archive Initiative (OAI) and Google Scholar by Nick Luft looks at one positive effect Google (and specifically Google Scholar) may have on digital publishing. One of the greatest barriers to retrieving and exchanging scholarly information online is the fact that database vendors (and …

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Digital libraries: Full of promise or full of foreboding? libraries, our digital future

by Meredith Farkas on 12/18/2004 with Comments Off on Digital libraries: Full of promise or full of foreboding?

The New York Times has a quite interesting piece today about what we lose and what we gain with the growth of digital libraries. In Questions and Praise for Google Web Library, the author explores a variety of viewpoints regarding Google’s recent announcement about digitizing the works of five of the great world libraries. I …

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Lost in the shuffle libraries, our digital future, search

by Meredith Farkas on 12/17/2004 with Comments Off on Lost in the shuffle

This is also huge digital library news, but, with the Google frenzy, they’ve really been the victim of bad timing. International Libraries and the Internet Archive collaborate to build Open-Access Text Archives Today, a number of International libraries have committed to putting their digitized books in open-access archives, starting with one at the Internet Archive. …

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Google and the “great digitization” libraries, our digital future, search

by Meredith Farkas on 12/17/2004 with Comments Off on Google and the “great digitization”

I’ve been quietly reading about the Google deal with the libraries of Stanford, University of Michigan, Harvard, Oxford, and New York City, and the resultant debates/rants on various blogs. I didn’t really want to go off on a half-cocked rant of my own, so I’ve spent the last few days thinking about what Google’s digitization …

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Linux more secure? Look at the statistics. open source

by Meredith Farkas on 12/15/2004 with Comments Off on Linux more secure? Look at the statistics.

According to Wired, a four-year study of the 2.6 Linux production kernel by Stanford University researchers has determined that there are 985 bugs in the 5.7 million lines of code. While this may seem a lot (it’s 0.17 bugs per 1,000 lines of code), compare that to the average piece of commercial software, which has …

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Oh those creative cable execs! “Transitional fair use” our digital future

by Meredith Farkas on 12/15/2004 with Comments Off on Oh those creative cable execs! “Transitional fair use”

Apparently, an executive at Time Warner has been shopping around a new idea of fair use that would benefit the television industry. It’s called “transitional fair use.” According to Rick Ellis at All Your TV, the cable companies are looking for ways to justify limiting how long people can view shows recorded with a DVR. …

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More on A-list bloggers and why we blog our digital future

by Meredith Farkas on 12/15/2004 with Comments Off on More on A-list bloggers and why we blog

There has been some blogging about blog popularity this week. Blake of LISNews looked at the popularity of library blogs – within the entire blogosphere and versus other library blogs. He looked at site stats in order to figure out how significant LISNews is. He realized that there are a number of ways of measuring …

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Art by children’s book illustrators for charity random

by Meredith Farkas on 12/12/2004 with Comments Off on Art by children’s book illustrators for charity

I just found this lovely site with snowflakes created by children’s book illustrators. Each snowflake will be auctioned off (on Ebay) to support the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. I’m sure some of the illustrators will be familiar to many of you, and their work represents the variety of styles of children’s book illustrations. My favorite …

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Words we can’t use anymore: Add “scholar” to the list search

by Meredith Farkas on 12/11/2004 with Comments Off on Words we can’t use anymore: Add “scholar” to the list

According to Slashdot, the American Chemical Society is suing Google over their use of the title Google Scholar. The American Chemical Society has a product called SciFinder Scholar, and they feel that Google Scholar infringes on their trademark. Wow, this is like Spike Lee thinking he has the sole right to the name Spike and …

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Denmark libraries, random

by Meredith Farkas on 12/11/2004 with 2 comments

When I looked at my page stats (which this time actually told me that someone other than my husband was reading my blog – woo hoo!) I found that people in Denmark had visited my site. I actually studied in Copenhagen for almost a year, and I think it is one of the best places …

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Graduating today, but still have a lot to learn job search, libraries, library school, our digital future

by Meredith Farkas on 12/11/2004 with Comments Off on Graduating today, but still have a lot to learn

Wow, so today is the day I graduate. Being that my whole library educational experience was virtual (except for my internship and a trip to the ALA conference in June) it all feels somewhat unreal or surreal. Since I’m not driving up to Tallahassee for graduation, there really isn’t going to be any fanfare. Maybe …

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